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Nutrients. 2017 Feb 10;9(2). pii: E126. doi: 10.3390/nu9020126.

Dietary Patterns of European Children and Their  Parents in Association with Family Food  Environment: Results from the I.Family Study.

Author information

1
Leibniz-Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, 28359 Bremen, Germany. helen.bogl@helsinki.fi.
2
Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, 83100 Avellino, Italy. asiani@isa.cnr.it.
3
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. stefaan.dehenauw@ugent.be.
4
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden. gabriele.eiben@medfak.gu.se.
5
Research and Education Institute of Child Health, 2035 Strovolos, Cyprus. kourides@cytanet.com.cy.
6
Institute for Medical Information Processing, Biometrics and Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 81377 Munich, Germany. eva.kovacs@med.uni.
7
German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 81377 Munich, Germany. eva.kovacs@med.uni.
8
GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain. lmoreno@unizar.es.
9
Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, 11619 Tallinn, Estonia. toomas.veidebaum@tai.ee.
10
Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, 20133 Milan, Italy. helen.bogl@helsinki.fi.
11
Leibniz-Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, 28359 Bremen, Germany. asiani@isa.cnr.it.
12
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland. asiani@isa.cnr.it.
13
Finnish Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014, Finland. asiani@isa.cnr.it.
14
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden. monica.hunsberger@gu.se.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between children's  and  parental  dietary  patterns  (DP),  and  whether  the  number  of  shared  meals  or  soft  drink  availability  during  meals  strengthens  this  association.  In  2013/2014  the  I.Family  study  cross-sectionally assessed the dietary intakes of families from eight European countries using 24-h  dietary recalls. Usual energy and food intakes from six- to 16-year-old children and their parents  were estimated based on the NCI Method. A total of 1662 child-mother and 789 child-father dyads  were included; DP were derived using cluster analysis. We investigated the association between  children's and parental DP and whether the number of shared meals or soft drink availability  moderated this association using mixed effects logistic regression models. Three DP comparable in  children and parents were obtained: Sweet & Fat, Refined Cereals, and Animal Products. Children  were more likely to be allocated to the Sweet & Fat DP when their fathers were allocated to the  Sweet & Fat DP and when they shared at least one meal per day (OR 3.18; 95% CI 1.84; 5.47). Being  allocated to the Sweet & Fat DP increased when the mother or the father was allocated to the Sweet  & Fat DP and when soft drinks were available (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.80; 4.28 or OR 4.26; 95% CI 2.16;  8.41, respectively). Availability of soft drinks and negative parental role modeling are important  predictors of children's dietary patterns.

KEYWORDS:

food consumption;   childhood obesity;  cluster analysis;  family resemblance;  shared meals;  soft drink

PMID:
28208650
PMCID:
PMC5331557
DOI:
10.3390/nu9020126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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