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Cornea. 2017 Apr;36(4):448-451. doi: 10.1097/ICO.0000000000001161.

Long-Term Clinical Course in Eyes With Peters Anomaly.

Author information

1
Departments of *Ophthalmology; and †Frontier Medical Science and Technology for Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Peters anomaly (PA) is known to be a primary cause of congenital corneal opacity. The aim of this study is to report the long-term clinical course and visual achievement of patients with PA who did not undergo keratoplasty.

METHODS:

This retrospective study involved 15 eyes of 9 infants with PA less than 5 months of age at initial presentation at the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine who were followed up without keratoplasty for more than 6 years after presentation. In each subject, visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), presence of congenital glaucoma, and change of corneal opacity were retrospectively investigated.

RESULTS:

At initial presentation, the mean patient age was 2.3 months (SD: 1.3; range: 0-4 mo), and the mean follow-up period was 7.9 years (SD: 1.8; range: 6.5-11.3 yrs). Of the 9 patients, 6 were affected bilaterally. Thirteen eyes of 7 patients were found to have glaucoma. Over the follow-up period, corneal opacity gradually decreased in 4 eyes, 1 eye each of 2 unilateral patients without glaucoma and both eyes of 1 bilaterally affected patient with good IOP control during the follow-up period. Visual acuity in the unilateral case with intensive amblyopia treatment gradually increased along with decreasing corneal opacity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings of this study show that a natural decrease of corneal opacity can occur in eyes with PA. In cases of unilateral PA without IOP elevation and no enlargement of the corneal diameter, strict amblyopia treatment is vital to obtain a favorable visual prognosis.

PMID:
28207433
DOI:
10.1097/ICO.0000000000001161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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