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Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 16;7:42836. doi: 10.1038/srep42836.

Exposure to tobacco smoke and childhood rhinitis: a population-based study.

Yao TC1,2,3, Chang SW4, Chang WC5, Tsai MH3,6, Liao SL3,6, Hua MC3,6, Lai SH3,7, Yeh KW1,3, Tseng YL1,3, Lin WC1,3, Tsai HJ8,9,10, Huang JL1,3.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
2
Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
3
Community Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan.
4
Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
5
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan.
7
Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
8
Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Institutes of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
10
Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Abstract

Exposure to tobacco smoke has been associated with harmful effects on child health. The association between tobacco smoke exposure and childhood rhinitis has not been established in developed or developing countries. We investigated the association between serum cotinine levels and rhinitis in a population sample of 1,315 Asian children. Serum cotinine levels were positively associated with rhinitis ever (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15-7.60) and current rhinitis (AOR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.07-6.89), while the association for physician-diagnosed rhinitis approaching borderline significance (AOR = 2.26; 95% CI: 0.88-5.83). Stratified analyses demonstrated significant association of serum cotinine levels with current rhinitis among children without allergic sensitization (AOR = 6.76; 95% CI: 1.21-37.74), but not among those with allergic sensitization. Serum cotinine levels were positively associated with rhinitis ever (AOR = 3.34; 95% CI: 1.05-10.61) and current rhinitis (AOR = 4.23; 95% CI: 1.28-13.97) among adolescents but not in children aged less than 10 years. This population-based study demonstrates supportive evidence for positive association of tobacco smoke exposure with rhinitis, while the effect is mainly confined to non-allergic rhinitis and more pronounced in adolescents than in young children, highlighting the need for raising public health awareness about the detrimental effects of tobacco smoke exposure on children's respiratory health.

PMID:
28205626
PMCID:
PMC5311963
DOI:
10.1038/srep42836
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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