Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2017 May;40(5):698-701. doi: 10.2337/dc16-2331. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Excess BMI in Childhood: A Modifiable Risk Factor for Type 1 Diabetes Development?

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA christine.ferrara@ucsf.edu.
2
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.
3
King's College London, London, U.K.
4
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.
5
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA.
6
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, U.K.
7
Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN.
8
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
9
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to determine the effect of elevated BMI over time on the progression to type 1 diabetes in youth.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

We studied 1,117 children in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention cohort (autoantibody-positive relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes). Longitudinally accumulated BMI above the 85th age- and sex-adjusted percentile generated a cumulative excess BMI (ceBMI) index. Recursive partitioning and multivariate analyses yielded sex- and age-specific ceBMI thresholds for greatest type 1 diabetes risk.

RESULTS:

Higher ceBMI conferred significantly greater risk of progressing to type 1 diabetes. The increased diabetes risk occurred at lower ceBMI values in children <12 years of age compared with older subjects and in females versus males.

CONCLUSIONS:

Elevated BMI is associated with increased risk of diabetes progression in pediatric autoantibody-positive relatives, but the effect varies by sex and age.

PMID:
28202550
PMCID:
PMC5399656
DOI:
10.2337/dc16-2331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center