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Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2017 Apr;18(4):e176-e181. doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000001097.

Career Development Support in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: A National Survey of Fellows and Junior Faculty.

Author information

1
1Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA. 2Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. 3Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine and Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD. 4Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the perceptions of current pediatric critical care medicine fellows and junior faculty regarding the extent and quality of career development support received during fellowship training.

DESIGN:

Web-based cross-sectional survey open from September to November 2015.

SETTING:

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pediatric critical care medicine fellowship programs.

SUBJECTS:

Pediatric critical care medicine fellows (second yr or higher) and junior faculty (within 5 yr of completing a pediatric critical care medicine fellowship program).

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

There were 129 respondents to the survey, representing 63% of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pediatric critical care medicine fellowship programs. Respondents were evenly divided between fellows and junior faculty. Nearly, half (49%) of respondents reported that their pediatric critical care medicine fellowship program provided a formal career development curriculum. Ideal career tracks chosen included academic clinician educator (64%), physician-scientist (27%), community-based (nonacademic) clinician (11%), and administrator (11%). There was a disparity in focused career development support provided by programs, with a minority providing good support for those pursuing a community-based clinician track (32%) or administrator track (16%). Only 43% of fellows perceived that they have a good chance of obtaining their ideal pediatric critical care medicine position, with the most common perceived barrier being increased competition for limited job opportunities. Most respondents expressed interest in a program specific to pediatric critical care medicine career development that is sponsored by a national professional organization.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most pediatric critical care medicine fellows and junior faculty reported good to excellent career development support during fellowship. However, important gaps remain, particularly for those pursuing community-based (nonacademic) and administrative tracks. Fellows were uncertain regarding future pediatric critical care medicine employment and their ability to pursue ideal career tracks. There may be a role for professional organizations to provide additional resources for career development in pediatric critical care medicine.

PMID:
28198755
PMCID:
PMC5380479
[Available on 2018-04-01]
DOI:
10.1097/PCC.0000000000001097
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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