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Oncoimmunology. 2016 Feb 18;6(1):e1132137. doi: 10.1080/2162402X.2015.1132137. eCollection 2017.

Enhancing the clinical coverage and anticancer efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade through manipulation of the gut microbiota.

Author information

1
Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus (GRCC), Villejuif, France; INSERM Unit U1015, Villejuif, France; Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France.
2
Institut Pasteur, Unit of Biology and Genetics of the Bacterial Cell Wall, Paris, France; INSERM, Equipe Avenir, Paris, France.
3
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Micalis-UMR1319 , Jouy-en-Josas, France.
4
University of Lille, CNRS, INSERM, Center Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, U1019, UMR 8204, Center d'Infection et d'Immunité de Lille (CIIL) , Lille, France.
5
Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus (GRCC), Villejuif, France; INSERM Unit U1015, Villejuif, France; Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France; INSERM Unit U932, Institut Curie, Paris Cedex 05, France; Center of Clinical Investigations in Biotherapies of Cancer (CICBT) 507, Villejuif, France.

Abstract

Although anticancer therapy with immune checkpoint blockers has seen unprecedented success, it fails to control neoplasia in most patients and often causes immune-related adverse events (irAEs). Our recent research shows the immunostimulatory and antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species of the gut microbiota, signifying novel approaches to improve such immunotherapies.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-CTLA-4; Bacteroides; T cell; cancer; ipilimumab; microbiome; microbiota

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