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Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2017 Apr;18(4):215-228. doi: 10.1038/nrm.2016.174. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

RNA-based recognition and targeting: sowing the seeds of specificity.

Gorski SA1, Vogel J1,2, Doudna JA3,4,5,6,7,8.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular Infection Biology, University of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2/D15, D-97080 Würzburg, Germany.
2
Helmholtz Institute for RNA based Infection Research (HIRI), University of Würzburg, D-97080 Würzburg, Germany.
3
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
4
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
5
California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
6
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
7
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
8
Innovative Genomics Initiative, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

Abstract

RNA is involved in the regulation of multiple cellular processes, often by forming sequence-specific base pairs with cellular RNA or DNA targets that must be identified among the large number of nucleic acids in a cell. Several RNA-based regulatory systems in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and small RNAs (sRNAs) that are dependent on the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, achieve specificity using similar strategies. Central to their function is the presentation of short 'seed sequences' within a ribonucleoprotein complex to facilitate the search for and recognition of targets.

PMID:
28196981
DOI:
10.1038/nrm.2016.174
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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