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J Epidemiol. 2017 Mar;27(3S):S77-S83. doi: 10.1016/j.je.2016.12.014. Epub 2017 Feb 11.

Cholesterol levels of Japanese dyslipidaemic patients with various comorbidities: BioBank Japan.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan. Electronic address: hyokomichi@yamanashi.ac.jp.
2
Department of Health Sciences, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan.
3
Department of Public Policy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Laboratory of Genome Technology, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
6
Laboratory for Statistical Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
7
Hisayama Research Institute for Lifestyle Diseases, Fukuoka, Japan.
8
Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
10
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
11
Tokushukai Hospitals, Japan.
12
Nippon Medical School, Japan.
13
Juntendo University, Japan.
14
Nihon University, Japan.
15
Iwate Medical University, Japan.
16
Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan.
17
The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Japan.
18
Aso Iizuka Hospital, Japan.
19
Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Japan.
20
Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan.
21
National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Japan.
22
Fukujuji Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Controlling serum cholesterol is critical to prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with dyslipidaemia. Guidelines emphasise the need to select treatment for dyslipidaemia based on specific patient profiles; however, there is little information about the serum cholesterol levels of patients in each profile in Japan. Therefore, we aimed to describe the serum cholesterol levels and prevalence of uncontrolled cases in Japanese patients with dyslipidaemia.

METHODS:

We included data for patients with dyslipidaemia between 2003 and 2007 from the BioBank Japan Project (66 hospitals). Then, we reported their serum cholesterol levels by age, body mass index, glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin A1c), blood pressure, smoking, drinking, comorbidity and medication profiles.

RESULTS:

We included 22,189 male and 21,545 female patients. The mean serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG) and non-HDL-C levels in males were 117.4 mg/dL, 51.0 mg/dL, 187.6 mg/dL and 153.6 mg/dL, respectively; the corresponding levels in females were 129.5 mg/dL, 60.5 mg/dL, 144.9 mg/dL and 157.9 mg/dL, respectively. In both males and females, the LDL-C levels were the highest in the following profiles: age 19-44 years, body mass index 18.5-22 kg/m2, glycated haemoglobin A1c <6.0%, never smoker, chronic respiratory disease as a comorbidity and no medication use.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data provide details of serum cholesterol levels by risk-factor profile in patients with dyslipidaemia and could add evidence of treatment decisions.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular diseases; Comorbidity; Dyslipidaemia; Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; Statins

PMID:
28196738
PMCID:
PMC5350591
DOI:
10.1016/j.je.2016.12.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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