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J Epidemiol. 2017 Mar;27(3S):S84-S91. doi: 10.1016/j.je.2016.12.011. Epub 2017 Feb 11.

Statin use and all-cause and cancer mortality: BioBank Japan cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan. Electronic address: hyokomichi@yamanashi.ac.jp.
2
Department of Public Policy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Laboratory of Genome Technology, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
5
Hisayama Research Institute for Lifestyle Diseases, Fukuoka, Japan.
6
Laboratory for Statistical Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
8
Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
9
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
10
Department of Health Sciences, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan.
11
Tokushukai Hospitals, Japan.
12
Nippon Medical School, Japan.
13
Juntendo University, Japan.
14
Nihon University, Japan.
15
Iwate Medical University, Japan.
16
Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan.
17
The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Japan.
18
Aso Iizuka Hospital, Japan.
19
Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Japan.
20
Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan.
21
National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Japan.
22
Fukujuji Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Statins are the first-line agents used to treat patients with high serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, thus reducing the risk of death from arterial sclerotic cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the effects of non-statin pharmacological interventions on mortality as well as about the potential protective effects of statin use against cancer death. This work aimed to compare all-cause and cancer mortality among patients with hyperlipidaemia who did and did not receive statin treatment.

METHODS:

Between 2003 and 2007 fiscal years, we recruited Japanese patients diagnosed with hyperlipidaemia from 66 hospitals. Patients in our cohort were followed up for a maximum of 12 years to observe the causes of death. Kaplan-Meier estimates from the baseline were used to compare the mortality of patients based on the administered medicine. All-cause mortality were compared among patients with/without administration of statins and other agents; any-organ and colorectal cancer mortality were compared between patients with/without administration of statins.

RESULTS:

Our cohort included 41,930 patients with mean ages of 64-66 years and mean body mass indices of 24-25 kg/m2. Patients who received statin monotherapy and were treated with lifestyle modification exhibited nearly identical survival curves, whereas statin use represented a non-significant but potentially protective effect against colorectal cancer-related mortality. The lowest mortality in this cohort was associated with resin monotherapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mortality rate has been similar for patients treated with statin monotherapy and lifestyle modification. Statin monotherapy could potentially reduce any-organ- and colorectal cancer-related mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-cholesterol agents; Colon cancer; Dyslipidaemia; Kaplan–Meier estimate; Statins

PMID:
28196737
PMCID:
PMC5350595
DOI:
10.1016/j.je.2016.12.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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