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Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 14;7:42033. doi: 10.1038/srep42033.

Paracingulate Sulcus Asymmetry in the Human Brain: Effects of Sex, Handedness, and Race.

Wei X1, Yin Y1, Rong M1, Zhang J1, Wang L1, Wu Y1, Cai Q2, Yu C3, Wang J1, Jiang T1,4,5,6,7.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 625014, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062, China.
3
Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China.
4
Brainnetome Center, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.
5
National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.
6
CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.
7
The Queensland Brain Institute, the University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia.

Abstract

The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is thought to play a key role in cognitive and affective regulation, has been widely reported to have a high degree of morphological inter-individual variability and asymmetry. An obvious difference is in the morphology of the paracingulate sulcus (PCS). Three types of PCS have been identified: prominent, present, and absent. In this study, we examined the relationship between PCS asymmetry and whether the asymmetry of the PCS is affected by sex, handedness, or race. PCS measurements were obtained from four datasets. The statistical results revealed that the PCS was more often prominent and present in the left hemisphere than in the right. The percentage of right-handed males with a prominent PCS was greater than that of right-handed females, but the percentage of left-handed males with a prominent PCS was lower than that of left-handed females. In addition, both male and female and both left-handed and right-handed subjects showed a leftward asymmetry of the PCS. Furthermore there were no significant racial differences in the leftward asymmetry of the PCS. Our findings about the morphological characteristics of the PCS may facilitate future clinical and cognitive studies of this area.

PMID:
28195205
PMCID:
PMC5307317
DOI:
10.1038/srep42033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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