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Midwifery. 2017 Apr;47:8-14. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2017.01.017. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Healthcare professionals' attitudes, knowledge and self-efficacy levels regarding the use of self-hypnosis in childbirth: A prospective questionnaire survey.

Author information

1
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, Praed Street, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sophiehaltonnathan@hotmail.com.
2
Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, James Clark Maxwell Building, 57 Waterloo Road, London SE1 8WA, United Kingdom.
3
Division of Women's Health, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, Women's Health Academic Centre, St. Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

to examine healthcare professionals' attitudes, knowledge and levels of self-efficacy regarding the use of self-hypnosis in childbirth.

DESIGN:

a prospective survey.

SETTING:

two large maternity units in London, England.

PARTICIPANTS:

healthcare professionals (n=129) involved in the care of childbearing women (anaesthetists, midwives and obstetricians).

METHODS:

online questionnaire assessing healthcare professionals' experience, knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy relating to self-hypnosis in childbirth.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

attitude, self-efficacy and knowledge.

FINDINGS:

over half of the participants surveyed (56%) reported they had minimal or no knowledge of hypnosis. Higher levels of knowledge were associated with higher levels of self-efficacy (p<0.001) and also with more positive attitudes (p<.001). Midwives reported significantly higher levels of knowledge, more positive attitudes (7.25, 95% CI: 4.60-9.89) and higher levels of self-efficacy (3.48, 95% CI: 1.46-5.51) than doctors. Midwives also reported more exposure to/experience of hypnosis than doctors, and more exposure was significantly associated with higher levels of self-efficacy (midwives p<.001; doctors p=.001). Professionals who would plan to use self-hypnosis in their own or partners' births had significantly higher self-efficacy scores (p<.001).

KEY CONCLUSIONS:

if healthcare professionals are to effectively support women using self-hypnosis in childbirth, they need to be confident in their ability to facilitate this method. Previous research has established that self-efficacy is a strong indicator of performance.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

Professionals with more knowledge of self-hypnosis are also more confident in supporting women using this technique in childbirth. Multi-disciplinary staff training which aims to increase knowledge, and which includes exposure to hypnosis in labour, may be beneficial in assisting staff to support women choosing to use self-hypnosis in labour.

KEYWORDS:

Attitudes; Childbirth; Healthcare surveys; Knowledge; Self-efficacy; Self-hypnosis

PMID:
28193595
DOI:
10.1016/j.midw.2017.01.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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