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Br J Dermatol. 2017 Jun;176(6):1633-1644. doi: 10.1111/bjd.15380. Epub 2017 May 19.

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses on psoriasis: role of funding sources, conflict of interest and bibliometric indices as predictors of methodological quality.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Menendez Pidal Ave, 14004 Córdoba, Spain.
2
Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC)/Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía/Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain.
3
School of Medicine, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain.
4
Department of Pharmacy, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Menendez Pidal Ave, 14004 Córdoba, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease that severely impairs quality of life and is associated with high costs, remains unknown.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews published on psoriasis.

METHODS:

After a comprehensive search in MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Database (PROSPERO: CDR42016041611), the quality of studies was assessed by two raters using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Article metadata and journal-related bibliometric indices were also obtained. Systematic reviews were classified as low (0-4), moderate (5-8) or high (9-11) quality. A prediction model for methodological quality was fitted using principal component and multivariate ordinal logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS:

We classified 220 studies as high (17·2%), moderate (55·0%) or low (27·8%) quality. Lower compliance rates were found for AMSTAR question (Q)5 (list of studies provided, 11·4%), Q10 (publication bias assessed, 27·7%), Q4 (status of publication included, 39·5%) and Q1 (a priori design provided, 40·9%). Factors such as meta-analysis inclusion [odds ratio (OR) 6·22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·78-14·86], funding by academic institutions (OR 2·90, 95% CI 1·11-7·89), Article Influence score (OR 2·14, 95% CI 1·05-6·67), 5-year impact factor (OR 1·34, 95% CI 1·02-1·40) and article page count (OR 1·08, 95% CI 1·02-1·15) significantly predicted higher quality. A high number of authors with a conflict of interest (OR 0·90, 95% CI 0·82-0·99) was significantly associated with lower quality.

CONCLUSIONS:

The methodological quality of systematic reviews published about psoriasis remains suboptimal. The type of funding sources and author conflicts may compromise study quality, increasing the risk of bias.

PMID:
28192600
DOI:
10.1111/bjd.15380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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