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J Epidemiol. 2017 Mar;27(3S):S22-S28. doi: 10.1016/j.je.2016.12.006. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

Overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data in 32 diseases.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Genome Technology, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Public Policy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Laboratory for Statistical Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
5
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
6
Department of Health Sciences, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan.
7
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
8
Hisayama Research Institute for Lifestyle Diseases, Fukuoka, Japan.
9
Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, Japan.
10
Division of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
11
Project Division of International Advanced Medical Research, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
12
Division of Clinical Genome Research, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
13
Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Division of Genetics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan.
14
SNP Research Center, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, Yokohama, Japan; Department of Human Genetics and Disease Diversity, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan; Bioresource Research Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
15
SNP Research Center, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, Yokohama, Japan; Shinko Clinic, Medical Corporation Shinkokai, Tokyo, Japan.
16
Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, USA.
17
Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Laboratory of Clinical Genome Sequencing, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: kmatsuda@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
18
Tokushukai Hospitals, Japan.
19
Nippon Medical School, Japan.
20
Juntendo University, Japan.
21
Nihon University, Japan.
22
Iwate Medical University, Japan.
23
Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan.
24
The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Japan.
25
Aso Iizuka Hospital, Japan.
26
Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Japan.
27
Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan.
28
National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Japan.
29
Fukujuji Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We established a patient-oriented biobank, BioBank Japan, with information on approximately 200,000 patients, suffering from any of 47 common diseases. This follow-up survey focused on 32 diseases, potentially associated with poor vital prognosis, and collected patient survival information, including cause of death. We performed a survival analysis for all subjects to get an overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data.

METHODS:

A total of 141,612 participants were included. The survival data were last updated in 2014. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed after categorizing subjects according to sex, age group, and disease status. Relative survival rates were estimated using a survival-rate table of the Japanese general population.

RESULTS:

Of 141,612 subjects (56.48% male) with 1,087,434 person-years and a 97.0% follow-up rate, 35,482 patients died during follow-up. Mean age at enrollment was 64.24 years for male subjects and 63.98 years for female subjects. The 5-year and 10-year relative survival rates for all subjects were 0.944 and 0.911, respectively, with a median follow-up duration of 8.40 years. Patients with pancreatic cancer had the least favorable prognosis (10-year relative survival: 0.184) and patients with dyslipidemia had the most favorable prognosis (1.013). The most common cause of death was malignant neoplasms. A number of subjects died from diseases other than their registered disease(s).

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first report to perform follow-up survival analysis across various common diseases. Further studies should use detailed clinical and genomic information to identify predictors of mortality in patients with common diseases, contributing to the implementation of personalized medicine.

KEYWORDS:

BioBank Japan project; Biobank; Clinical information; Common disease; Follow-up survey

PMID:
28190660
PMCID:
PMC5363789
DOI:
10.1016/j.je.2016.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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