Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Metab. 2017 Sep;43(4):338-344. doi: 10.1016/j.diabet.2017.01.003. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

Maternal and paternal family history of diabetes in second-degree relatives and metabolic outcomes at age 5-6 years: The ABCD Study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Post box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.oostvogels@amc.nl.
2
Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Post box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Post box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Post box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate whether children with a family history of diabetes (FHD) in second-degree relatives (grandparents, aunts/uncles) are at increased risk of developing obesity and diabetes, and whether the risk differs between maternal or paternal transmission.

METHODS:

In the multiethnic population-based cohort Amsterdam-Born Children and Their Development (ABCD) Study, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-height ratio (WHR), fat percentage (fat%), fasting glucose and C-peptide in 5- or 6-year-old children with no second-degree FHD (n=2226) were compared with children with maternal-only (n=353), paternal-only (n=281) or both maternal and paternal (n=164) second-degree FHD. Children of diabetic mothers or fathers were excluded.

RESULTS:

None of the children in any of our FHD categories differed in body composition after adjusting for maternal, paternal and childhood lifestyle covariates. However, children with both maternal and paternal second-degree FHD had increased C-peptide levels (0.03nmol, 95% CI: 0.01-0.05) compared with those in the other three study groups. Results were similar when analyses were restricted to only the Dutch children.

CONCLUSION:

Children with FHD in second-degree relatives on both maternal and paternal sides already have higher C-peptide levels at an early age. This might be the result of a double burden of a shared obesogenic lifestyle, or of more diverse diabetogenic genes compared to children without FHD or with only FHD in one side of the family. In any case, second-degree FHD could be used as a public-health screening tool to identify children at risk of adverse metabolic outcomes and of possible future disease.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Diabetes; Family history; Glucose metabolism; Second-degree relatives

PMID:
28190592
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabet.2017.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Masson (France)
Loading ...
Support Center