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Arch Virol. 2017 Jun;162(6):1529-1539. doi: 10.1007/s00705-017-3251-2. Epub 2017 Feb 11.

First isolation and characterization of pteropine orthoreoviruses in fruit bats in the Philippines.

Author information

1
Department of Virology 1, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 4-7-1 Gakuen, Musashimurayama, Tokyo, 208-0011, Japan.
2
Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary MedicineYamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi, 753-8515, Japan.
3
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8657, Japan.
4
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of the Philippine Los Baños, Los Baños, 4031, Laguna, Philippines.
5
University of the Philippines Mindanao, Bago-Oshiro, Davao, Philippines.
6
Museum of Natural History, University of the Philippines Los Baños, Los Baños, 4031, Laguna, Philippines.
7
Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 4-7-1 Gakuen, Musashimurayama, Tokyo, 208-0011, Japan.
8
Research and Education Center for Prevention of Global Infectious Diseases of Animals, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, 183-8509, Japan.
9
Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201, Japan.
10
Department of Animal Risk Management, Chiba Institute of Science, Choshi, Chiba, 288-0025, Japan.
11
Department of Virology 1, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 4-7-1 Gakuen, Musashimurayama, Tokyo, 208-0011, Japan. msaijo@niid.go.jp.
12
Department of Virology 1, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-8640, Japan. msaijo@niid.go.jp.
13
Department of Biomedical Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8657, Japan.

Abstract

Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) causes respiratory tract illness (RTI) in humans. PRVs were isolated from throat swabs collected from 9 of 91 wild bats captured on the Mindanao Islands, The Philippines, in 2013. The nucleic acid sequence of the whole genome of each of these isolates was determined. Phylogenetic analysis based on predicted amino acid sequences indicated that the isolated PRVs were novel strains in which re-assortment events had occurred in the viral genome. Serum specimens collected from 76 of 84 bats were positive for PRV-neutralizing antibodies suggesting a high prevalence of PRV in wild bats in the Philippines. The bat-borne PRVs isolated in the Philippines were characterized in comparison to an Indonesian PRV isolate, Miyazaki-Bali/2007 strain, recovered from a human patient, revealing that the Philippine bat-borne PRVs had similar characteristics in terms of antigenicity to those of the Miyazaki-Bali/2007 strain, but with a slight difference (e.g., growth capacity in vitro). The impact of the Philippine bat-borne PRVs should be studied in human RTI cases in the Philippines.

PMID:
28190201
DOI:
10.1007/s00705-017-3251-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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