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Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017 Sep;26(9):1067-1079. doi: 10.1007/s00787-017-0959-1. Epub 2017 Feb 11.

Elimination diets' efficacy and mechanisms in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
Karakter, Child and Adolescents Psychiatry, Reinier Postlaan 12, 6525 GC, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. v.ly@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.
2
Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. v.ly@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.
3
Leiden University, Institute of Psychology and Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, The Netherlands. v.ly@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.
4
Triversum, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Alkmaar, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
8
Department of Human Genetics and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
9
Karakter, Child and Adolescents Psychiatry, Reinier Postlaan 12, 6525 GC, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Nutrition plays an important role in neurodevelopment. This insight has led to increasing research into the efficacy of nutrition-related interventions for treating neurodevelopmental disorders. This review discusses an elimination diet as a treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder, with a focus on the efficacy of the food additives exclusion diet, gluten-free/casein-free diet and oligoantigenic diet. Furthermore, we discuss the potential mechanisms of elimination diets' effects in these neurodevelopmental disorders. The main candidate mechanism is the microbiome-gut-brain axis possibly involving complex interactions between multiple systems, including the metabolic, immune, endocrine, and neural system. We conclude with practical implications and future directions into the investigation of an elimination diet's efficacy in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; Autism spectrum disorder; Elimination diet; Food sensitivity; Gut–brain interaction

PMID:
28190137
PMCID:
PMC5591346
DOI:
10.1007/s00787-017-0959-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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