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Cell. 2017 Feb 9;168(4):600-612. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.01.014.

Applications of Immunogenomics to Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: xsliu@jimmy.harvard.edu.
2
Institute for Genomic Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, and The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 575 Children's Crossroad, Columbus OH 43205, USA. Electronic address: elaine.mardis@nationwidechildrens.org.

Abstract

Cancer immunogenomics originally was framed by research supporting the hypothesis that cancer mutations generated novel peptides seen as "non-self" by the immune system. The search for these "neoantigens" has been facilitated by the combination of new sequencing technologies, specialized computational analyses, and HLA binding predictions that evaluate somatic alterations in a cancer genome and interpret their ability to produce an immune-stimulatory peptide. The resulting information can characterize a tumor's neoantigen load, its cadre of infiltrating immune cell types, the T or B cell receptor repertoire, and direct the design of a personalized therapeutic.

PMID:
28187283
PMCID:
PMC5972371
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2017.01.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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