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Cereb Cortex. 2017 Jul 1;27(7):3790-3805. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhx026.

Body Topography Parcellates Human Sensory and Motor Cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig 04103, Germany.
2
Department of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London WC1H 0DG, UK.
3
Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences Magdeburg, Magdeburg 39106, Germany.
4
Aging and Cognition Research Group, DZNE, Magdeburg 39106, Germany.
5
Department of Neurophysics, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig 04103, Germany.
6
Faculty of Computer Science, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg 39106, Germany.
7
Max Planck Research Group for Neuroanatomy & Connectivity, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig04103, Germany.
8
Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig04103, Germany.
9
Department of Neurophysics, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig04103, Germany.
10
Department of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, LondonWC1H 0DG, UK.

Abstract

The cytoarchitectonic map as proposed by Brodmann currently dominates models of human sensorimotor cortical structure, function, and plasticity. According to this model, primary motor cortex, area 4, and primary somatosensory cortex, area 3b, are homogenous areas, with the major division lying between the two. Accumulating empirical and theoretical evidence, however, has begun to question the validity of the Brodmann map for various cortical areas. Here, we combined in vivo cortical myelin mapping with functional connectivity analyses and topographic mapping techniques to reassess the validity of the Brodmann map in human primary sensorimotor cortex. We provide empirical evidence that area 4 and area 3b are not homogenous, but are subdivided into distinct cortical fields, each representing a major body part (the hand and the face). Myelin reductions at the hand-face borders are cortical layer-specific, and coincide with intrinsic functional connectivity borders as defined using large-scale resting state analyses. Our data extend the Brodmann model in human sensorimotor cortex and suggest that body parts are an important organizing principle, similar to the distinction between sensory and motor processing.

KEYWORDS:

embodiment; hand–face border; parcellation; plasticity; septa

PMID:
28184419
PMCID:
PMC6248394
DOI:
10.1093/cercor/bhx026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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