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Adv Mind Body Med. 2017 Winter;31(1):4-9.

Effects of Mind Sound Resonance Technique (Yogic Relaxation) on Psychological States, Sleep Quality, and Cognitive Functions in Female Teachers: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Abstract

Context • Several studies have revealed a high rate of physical and psychological problems from stress among schoolteachers. Yoga is one of the mind-body interventions known to alleviate stress and effects. The mind sound resonance technique (MSRT), a yoga-based, mindfulness relaxation is recognized as having a positive influence on physical and psychological health. Objectives • The study intended to examine the effects of an MSRT intervention for 1 mo on perceived stress, quality of sleep, cognitive function, state and trait anxiety, psychological distress, and fatigue among female teachers. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study occurred at 2 primary schools in Bangalore City, India. Participants • Sixty female teachers, aged between 30 and 55 y, from the 2 schools were enrolled in the study. Intervention • The participants were randomly divided into an MSRT group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). Participants in the MSRT group participated in MSRT for 30 min/d, 5 d/wk, for the duration of 1 mo. The participants in the control group followed their normal daily routines. Outcome measures • Perceived stress, sleep quality, cognitive function, anxiety, psychological distress, fatigue, and self-esteem were assessed using standardized assessment tools at baseline and after 1 mo of the intervention. Results • In the MSRT group, a significant reduction occurred for 5 variables: (1) 47.01% for perceived stress (P < .001), (2) 28.76% for state anxiety (P < .001), (3) 13.35% for trait anxiety (P < .001), (4) 32.90% for psychological distress (P < .001), and (5) 44.79% for fatigue (P < .001). A significant improvement occurred for that group for 2 variables: (1) 44.94% for quality of sleep (P < .001), and (2) 12.12% for self-esteem (P < .001). An 11.88% increase occurred for the group for cognitive function, but the change was not significant (P = .111). On the other hand, the control group showed significant increases in 5 variables: (1) 55.56% for perceived stress (P < .001), (2) 13.32% for state anxiety (P < .001), (3) 21.28% for trait anxiety (P < .001), (4) 20.95% for psychological distress (P = .103), and (5) 16.44% for fatigue (P < .001). The group also showed significant decreases in 3 variables: (1) 3.51% for self-esteem (P < .001), (2) 21.39% for quality of sleep (P = .003), and (3) 17.60% for cognitive function (P = .002). A comparison between the 2 groups showed significant differences in 7 variables: (1) perceived stress (P < .001), (2) quality of sleep (P < .001), (3) state anxiety (P < .001), (4) trait anxiety (P < .001), (5) psychological distress (P = .006), (6) fatigue (P = .005), and (7) self-esteem (P < .001). No significant differences existed between the groups in cognitive function (P = .083). Conclusions • In the current study, the practice of MSRT facilitated a reduction in the levels of stress, anxiety, fatigue, and psychological distress. The relaxation technique also enhanced the levels of self-esteem and quality of sleep among female teachers working in primary schools.

PMID:
28183071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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