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J Wound Care. 2017 Feb 2;26(2):51-57. doi: 10.12968/jowc.2017.26.2.51.

Efficacy and safety of a new coverlet device on skin microclimate management: a pilot study in critical care patients.

Author information

1
Service de réanimation polyvalente et surveillance continue, Hôpital Antoine Béclère, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Paris Sud, Clamart, France.
2
Service de réanimation polyvalente et surveillance continue, Hôpital Antoine Béclère, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Paris Sud, Clamart, France; INSERM U999, Université Paris Sud, Le plessis Robinson, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the effect of a new coverlet device, allowing air circulation at the body/underlying surface interface, on skin microclimate management.

METHOD:

This prospective observational pilot study took place in a 15-bed university-affiliated intensive care unit. Overall, 34 mechanically ventilated patients were included. Skin humidity and temperature were monitored before and after the implementation of the tested device at the occiput, scapulas, buttocks and sacrum. Humidity and temperature were evaluated through surface skin impedance and an infra-red thermometer, respectively. Health professionals were asked to evaluate the device.

RESULTS:

After implementation of the coverlet device, there was a rapid, sustained and significant decrease in skin humidity at all sites ranging from 6 % to 15 %, excluding the occiput. Skin temperature also significantly decreased from 1 % at both scapulas, but not at the other studied body sites. No side effects were observed. Health professionals reported that the device was easy and quick to install. Although they did not report a subjective improvement in skin moisture or temperature, they considered the device to be efficient.

CONCLUSION:

Although limited by its design, this pilot study suggests a good efficacy of the studied device on skin microclimate management. Further data are warranted to test the clinical implications of our findings.

KEYWORDS:

critical care; moisture; pressure ulcer; skin microclimate; temperature

PMID:
28182521
DOI:
10.12968/jowc.2017.26.2.51
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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