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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2017 Apr;75:257-273. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.01.032. Epub 2017 Feb 6.

Cooccurrence and bidirectional prediction of sleep disturbances and depression in older adults: Meta-analysis and systematic review.

Author information

1
National Institute on Drug Dependence and Beijing Key laboratory of Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China. Electronic address: baoyp@bjmu.edu.cn.
2
National Institute on Drug Dependence and Beijing Key laboratory of Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China.
3
National Institute on Drug Dependence and Beijing Key laboratory of Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China; School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China.
4
National Institute on Drug Dependence and Beijing Key laboratory of Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China; Peking University Sixth Hospital, Peking University Institute of Mental Health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders (Peking University Sixth Hospital), Beijing 100191, China.
5
Sleep Medicine Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China.
6
National Institute on Drug Dependence and Beijing Key laboratory of Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China; Peking University Sixth Hospital, Peking University Institute of Mental Health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders (Peking University Sixth Hospital), Beijing 100191, China; Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China. Electronic address: linlu@bjmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The present study pooled the prevalence of sleep disturbances and depression in community-dwelling older adults (mean age≥60years) and quantified the strength of evidence of the relationship between these two problems. From 23 cross-sectional studies and five sets of baseline data, a high pooled prevalence of sleep disturbances (30.5%), depressive symptoms (18.1%) and coexisting disorders (10.6%) were found. In the 23 cohort studies, self-reported sleep disturbances increased the risk of the onset of depression (relative risk [RR]=1.92). Persistent sleep disturbances increased the risk of the development (RR=3.90), recurrence (RR=7.70), and worsening (RR=1.46) of depression in older adults. Little support was found for a predictive role for objective sleep characteristics in the development of depression. Older adults with depression had a higher risk of developing (RR=1.72) and worsening (RR=1.73) symptoms of sleep disturbances. This review emphasizes the importance of timely interventions in incipient sleep disturbances and depression among older adults, preventing the development of more serious comorbidities.

KEYWORDS:

Bidirectional prediction; Cooccurrence; Depression; Older adults; Sleep disturbances

PMID:
28179129
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.01.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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