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Nature. 2017 Feb 16;542(7641):307-312. doi: 10.1038/nature21370. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

The genome of Chenopodium quinoa.

Author information

1
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Biological and Environmental Sciences &Engineering Division (BESE), Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia.
2
Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen UR Plant Breeding, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
3
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC), Biological and Environmental Sciences &Engineering Division (BESE), Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia.
4
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC), Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences &Engineering Division (CEMSE), Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia.
5
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Red Sea Research Center (RSRC), Biological and Environmental Sciences &Engineering Division (BESE), Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia.
6
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Analytical Core Lab, Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia.
7
Brigham Young University, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Provo, Utah 84602, USA.
8
Plant Breeding Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Olshausenstr. 40, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
9
Metabolomics Australia, The School of Biosciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.
10
PRI Bioscience, Plant Research International, Wageningen UR, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for quinoa, which was produced using single-molecule real-time sequencing in combination with optical, chromosome-contact and genetic maps. We also report the sequencing of two diploids from the ancestral gene pools of quinoa, which enables the identification of sub-genomes in quinoa, and reduced-coverage genome sequences for 22 other samples of the allotetraploid goosefoot complex. The genome sequence facilitated the identification of the transcription factor likely to control the production of anti-nutritional triterpenoid saponins found in quinoa seeds, including a mutation that appears to cause alternative splicing and a premature stop codon in sweet quinoa strains. These genomic resources are an important first step towards the genetic improvement of quinoa.

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PMID:
28178233
DOI:
10.1038/nature21370
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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