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Nutrients. 2017 Feb 7;9(2). pii: E115. doi: 10.3390/nu9020115.

Gluten Contamination in Naturally or Labeled Gluten-Free Products Marketed in Italy.

Author information

1
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. anilkrvermaa@gmail.com.
2
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. simona.gatti@hotmail.it.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. simona.gatti@hotmail.it.
4
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. t.galeazzi@univpm.it.
5
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. chiara.monachesi28@gmail.com.
6
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. luciapadella@libero.it.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. giadadelbaldo@gmail.com.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. robertannibali@hotmail.it.
9
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. mariaelenalionetti@gmail.com.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. mariaelenalionetti@gmail.com.
11
Celiac Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. c.catassi@univpm.it.
12
Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60123 Ancona, Italy. c.catassi@univpm.it.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only treatment of celiac disease. Gluten contamination has been frequently reported in nominally gluten-free products. The aim of this study was to test the level of gluten contamination in gluten-free products currently available in the Italian market.

METHOD:

A total of 200 commercially available gluten-free products (including both naturally and certified gluten-free products) were randomly collected from different Italian supermarkets. The gluten content was determined by the R5 ELISA Kit approved by EU regulations.

RESULTS:

Gluten level was lower than 10 part per million (ppm) in 173 products (86.5%), between 10 and 20 ppm in 9 (4.5%), and higher than 20 ppm in 18 (9%), respectively. In contaminated foodstuff (gluten > 20 ppm) the amount of gluten was almost exclusively in the range of a very low gluten content. Contaminated products most commonly belonged to oats-, buckwheat-, and lentils-based items. Certified and higher cost gluten-free products were less commonly contaminated by gluten.

CONCLUSION:

Gluten contamination in either naturally or labeled gluten-free products marketed in Italy is nowadays uncommon and usually mild on a quantitative basis. A program of systematic sampling of gluten-free food is needed to promptly disclose at-risk products.

KEYWORDS:

R5 ELISA; buckwheat; celiac disease; gluten-free products; lentils; naturally gluten-free; oats

PMID:
28178205
PMCID:
PMC5331546
DOI:
10.3390/nu9020115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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