Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2017 Mar;117(3):501-509. doi: 10.1007/s00421-017-3551-y. Epub 2017 Feb 6.

Effectiveness of using wearable vibration therapy to alleviate muscle soreness.

Author information

1
School of Sport and Exercise, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, New Zealand. D.Cochrane@massey.ac.nz.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine the acute and short-term effect of a wearable vibration device following strenuous eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors.

METHODS:

Physically active males (n = 13) performed vibration therapy (VT) and control following eccentric exercise. The arms were randomised and counterbalanced, separated by 14 days. 15 min of VT (120 Hz) was applied immediately and 24, 48, and 72 h after eccentric exercise while the contralateral arm performed no VT (control). Muscle (isometric and concentric) strength, range of motion, electromyography (EMG), muscle soreness and creatine kinase were taken pre-exercise, immediately and 24, 48, and 72 h post-eccentric exercise. Additionally, the acute effect of VT of muscle strength, range of motion, EMG, muscle soreness was also investigated immediately after VT.

RESULTS:

In the short-term VT was able to significantly reduce the level of biceps brachii pain at 24 h (p < 0.05) and 72 h (p < 0.01), enhance pain threshold at 48 h (p < 0.01) and 72 h (p < 0.01), improve range of motion at 24 h (p < 0.05), 48 h (p < 0.01) and 72 h (p < 0.01) and significantly (p < 0.05) reduced creatine kinase at 72 h compared to control. Acutely, following VT treatment muscle pain and range of motion significantly improved (p < 0.05) at 24 h post, 48 h post, and 72 h post but no significant changes in muscle strength and EMG were reported acutely or short-term.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acute and short-term VT attenuated muscle soreness, creatine kinase and improved range of motion; however, there was no improvement of muscle strength recovery compared to control following eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors.

KEYWORDS:

Concentric torque; Creatine kinase; Muscle damage; Recovery

PMID:
28168554
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-017-3551-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center