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Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2017 Mar;46(1):19-35. doi: 10.1016/j.gtc.2016.09.004. Epub 2017 Jan 3.

Biology of the Microbiome 1: Interactions with the Host Immune Response.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Immunology, Wroclaw Medical University, Chalubinskiego 5, Wroclaw 50-368, Poland.
2
Alimentary Health Pharma Davos, Obere Strasse 22, Davos Platz 7270, Switzerland.
3
Molecular Immunology, Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research, University of Zurich, Obere Strasse 22, Davos Platz 7270, Switzerland. Electronic address: liam.omahony@siaf.uzh.ch.

Abstract

The intestinal immune system is intimately connected with the vast diversity of microbes present within the gut and the diversity of food components that are consumed daily. The discovery of novel molecular mechanisms, which mediate host-microbe-nutrient communication, have highlighted the important roles played by microbes and dietary factors in influencing mucosal immune responses. Dendritic cells, epithelial cells, innate lymphoid cells, T regulatory cells, effector lymphocytes, natural killer T cells, and B cells can all be influenced by the microbiome. Many of the mechanisms being described are bacterial strain or metabolite specific.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptive immune system; Histamine; Innate immune system; Microbiome; SCFA

PMID:
28164850
DOI:
10.1016/j.gtc.2016.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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