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Neuron. 2017 Feb 22;93(4):940-954.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.01.006. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

A Neural Circuit for Auditory Dominance over Visual Perception.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea. Electronic address: shlee1@kaist.ac.kr.

Abstract

When conflicts occur during integration of visual and auditory information, one modality often dominates the other, but the underlying neural circuit mechanism remains unclear. Using auditory-visual discrimination tasks for head-fixed mice, we found that audition dominates vision in a process mediated by interaction between inputs from the primary visual (VC) and auditory (AC) cortices in the posterior parietal cortex (PTLp). Co-activation of the VC and AC suppresses VC-induced PTLp responses, leaving AC-induced responses. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons in the PTLp mainly receive AC inputs, and muscimol inactivation of the PTLp or optogenetic inhibition of its PV+ neurons abolishes auditory dominance in the resolution of cross-modal sensory conflicts without affecting either sensory perception. Conversely, optogenetic activation of PV+ neurons in the PTLp enhances the auditory dominance. Thus, our results demonstrate that AC input-specific feedforward inhibition of VC inputs in the PTLp is responsible for the auditory dominance during cross-modal integration.

KEYWORDS:

artificial perception; auditory cortex; feedforward inhibition; multisensory integration; parvalbumin-positive interneuron; perception; posterior parietal cortex; sensory conflict; sensory discrimination; visual cortex

PMID:
28162806
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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