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Trends Immunol. 2017 Mar;38(3):181-193. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2016.12.007. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Making Mouse Models That Reflect Human Immune Responses.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
2
Department of Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA; Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. Electronic address: Tiffany.Reese@utsouthwestern.edu.

Abstract

Humans are infected with a variety of acute and chronic pathogens over the course of their lives, and pathogen-driven selection has shaped the immune system of humans. The same is likely true for mice. However, laboratory mice we use for most biomedical studies are bred in ultra-hygienic environments, and are kept free of specific pathogens. We review recent studies that indicate that pathogen infections are important for the basal level of activation and the function of the immune system. Consideration of these environmental exposures of both humans and mice can potentially improve mouse models of human disease.

PMID:
28161189
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2016.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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