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Mol Biol Evol. 2017 May 1;34(5):1155-1166. doi: 10.1093/molbev/msx065.

Changes in Lipidome Composition during Brain Development in Humans, Chimpanzees, and Macaque Monkeys.

Author information

1
CAS Key Laboratory of Computational Biology, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, CAS, Shanghai, China.
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
3
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa, Japan.
4
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.
5
Department of Anthropology and Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.
6
Fishberg Department of Neuroscience and Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
7
MAEBIOS, Alamogordo, NM.
8
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam, Germany.
9
Skoltech Center for Computational and Systems Biology, Skolkovo Institute for Science and Technology, Skolkovo, Russia.

Abstract

Lipids are essential components of the brain. Here, we conducted a comprehensive mass spectrometry-based analysis of lipidome composition in the prefrontal cortex of 40 humans, 40 chimpanzees, and 40 rhesus monkeys over postnatal development and adulthood. Of the 11,772 quantified lipid peaks, 7,589 change significantly along the lifespan. More than 60% of these changes occur prior to adulthood, with less than a quarter associated with myelination progression. Evolutionarily, 36% of the age-dependent lipids exhibit concentration profiles distinct to one of the three species; 488 (18%) of them were unique to humans. In both humans and chimpanzees, the greatest extent of species-specific differences occurs in early development. Human-specific lipidome differences, however, persist over most of the lifespan and reach their peak from 20 to 35 years of age, when compared with chimpanzee-specific ones.

KEYWORDS:

brain; development; evolution; lipidome

PMID:
28158622
PMCID:
PMC5400384
DOI:
10.1093/molbev/msx065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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