Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fam Pract. 2017 Jun 1;34(3):347-352. doi: 10.1093/fampra/cmw143.

Reconciling research and community priorities in participatory trials: application to Padres Informados/Jovenes Preparados.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, USA.
3
Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
4
Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA.
5
Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, USA.
6
CentroTyrone Guzman, Minneapolis, USA and.
7
Aquí Para Ti/Here for You Clinic for Latino Youth, Hennepin County Medical Center; Department of Family and Community Medicine, Minneapolis, USA.

Abstract

Background:

Participatory research (PR) trials aim to achieve the dual, and at times competing, demands of producing an intervention and research process that address community perspectives and priorities, while establishing intervention effectiveness.

Objective:

To identify research and community priorities that must be reconciled in the areas of collaborative processes, study design and aim and study implementation quality in order to successfully conduct a participatory trial. We describe how this reconciliation was approached in the smoking prevention participatory trial Padres Informados/Jovenes Preparados (Informed Parents/Prepared Youth) and evaluate the success of our reconciled priorities.

Methods:

Data sources to evaluate success of the reconciliations included a survey of all partners regarding collaborative group processes, intervention participant recruitment and attendance and surveys of enrolled study participants assessing intervention outcomes.

Results:

While we successfully achieved our reconciled collaborative processes and implementation quality goals, we did not achieve our reconciled goals in study aim and design. Due in part to the randomized wait-list control group design chosen in the reconciliation process, we were not able to demonstrate overall efficacy of the intervention or offer timely services to families in need of support.

Conclusion:

Achieving the goals of participatory trials is challenging but may yield community and research benefits. Innovative research designs are needed to better support the complex goals of participatory trials.

KEYWORDS:

Community based participatory research; Latinos; hybrid trial; prevention; research design; translational health research.

PMID:
28158524
PMCID:
PMC6080533
DOI:
10.1093/fampra/cmw143
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center