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Clin Oral Investig. 2017 Nov;21(8):2619-2627. doi: 10.1007/s00784-017-2063-9. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Injectable platelet rich fibrin (i-PRF): opportunities in regenerative dentistry?

Author information

1
Department of Periodontology, College of Dental Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. rmiron@nova.edu.
2
Cell Therapy Institute, Center for Collaborative Research, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. rmiron@nova.edu.
3
Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. rmiron@nova.edu.
4
Department of Periodontology, College of Dental Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.
5
Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
6
Department of Oral Surgery, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan.
7
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.
8
Department of Oral Implantology, University of Wuhan, Wuhan, China.
9
FORM, Frankfurt Oral Regenerative Medicine, Clinic for Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Am Main, Germany.
10
Pain Clinic, Nice, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Platelet rich plasma (PRP) has been utilized in regenerative dentistry as a supra-physiological concentrate of autologous growth factors capable of stimulating tissue regeneration. Despite this, concerns have been expressed regarding the use of anti-coagulants, agents known to inhibit wound healing. In this study, a liquid formulation of platelet rich fibrin (PRF) termed injectable-PRF (i-PRF) without the use of anti-coagulants was investigated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Standard PRP and i-PRF (centrifuged at 700 rpm (60G) for 3 min) were compared for growth factor release up to 10 days (8 donor samples). Furthermore, fibroblast biocompatibility at 24 h (live/dead assay); migration at 24 h; proliferation at 1, 3, and 5 days, and expression of PDGF, TGF-β, and collagen1 at 3 and 7 days were investigated.

RESULTS:

Growth factor release demonstrated that in general PRP had higher early release of growth factors whereas i-PRF showed significantly higher levels of total long-term release of PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB, EGF, and IGF-1 after 10 days. PRP showed higher levels of TGF-β1 and VEGF at 10 days. While both formulations exhibited high biocompatibility and higher fibroblast migration and proliferation when compared to control tissue-culture plastic, i-PRF induced significantly highest migration whereas PRP demonstrated significantly highest cellular proliferation. Furthermore, i-PRF showed significantly highest mRNA levels of TGF-β at 7 days, PDGF at 3 days, and collagen1 expression at both 3 and 7 days when compared to PRP.

CONCLUSIONS:

i-PRF demonstrated the ability to release higher concentrations of various growth factors and induced higher fibroblast migration and expression of PDGF, TGF-β, and collagen1. Future animal research is now necessary to further validate the use of i-PRF as a bioactive agent capable of stimulating tissue regeneration.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

The findings from the present study demonstrate that a potent formulation of liquid platelet concentrates could be obtained without use of anti-coagulants.

KEYWORDS:

Blood platelets; Fibrin; Fibroblasts; Platelet rich fibrin; Regeneration; Wound healing

PMID:
28154995
DOI:
10.1007/s00784-017-2063-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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