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Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2017 Dec 15;458:22-28. doi: 10.1016/j.mce.2017.01.041. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

Traversing barriers - How thyroid hormones pass placental, blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers.

Author information

1
Conjoint Endocrine Laboratory, Chemical Pathology, Pathology Queensland, Queensland Health, Herston, Qld 4029, Australia.
2
Conjoint Endocrine Laboratory, Chemical Pathology, Pathology Queensland, Queensland Health, Herston, Qld 4029, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, Qld 4029, Australia; School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4000, Australia. Electronic address: kerry.richard@qimrberghofer.edu.au.

Abstract

Thyroid hormone is essential for normal human fetal growth and brain development. As the fetal thyroid does not secrete thyroid hormones until about 18 weeks gestation, early fetal brain development depends on passage of maternal hormone across the placenta into the fetal circulation. To reach the fetal brain, maternally derived and endogenously produced thyroid hormone has to cross the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers. In this review we will discuss the complex biological barriers (involving membrane transporters, enzymes and distributor proteins) that must be overcome to ensure that the developing human brain has adequate exposure to thyroid hormone.

KEYWORDS:

Blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier; Blood–brain barrier; Brain; Placenta; Thyroid hormone

PMID:
28153799
DOI:
10.1016/j.mce.2017.01.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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