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J Pediatr Urol. 2017 Aug;13(4):386.e1-386.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.12.009. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Patterns of care and survival outcomes for adolescent and young adult patients with testicular seminoma in the United States: A National Cancer Database analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
2
Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
5
Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: nicholas.cost@childrenscolorado.org.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common solid tumor among adolescent and young adult (AYA) males. AYA patients with GCTs most typically have non-seminoma compared with seminoma, and accordingly there are fewer data reported on the AYA experience with testicular seminoma.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate national trends in postoperative treatment and overall survival (OS) outcomes in testicular seminoma by age group, specifically comparing AYAs with older adults.

STUDY DESIGN:

The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for patients with testicular seminoma diagnosed between 2004 and 2012, who underwent orchiectomy followed by observation or adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, radiation (RT), or both). Patients were grouped by age: AYA (15-39 years), adults between 40 and 55 years, and adults >55 years. Overall survival (OS) was presented using Kaplan-Meier curves and groups compared via a log-rank test. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate (MVA) analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Binary multiple logistic regression identified differences in variables by age category.

RESULTS:

Of the total 22,361 patients the majority were AYAs (12,880, 57.6%), followed by adults 40-55 years (8,022, 35.9%), and >55 years (1,459, 6.5%). Unadjusted 5-year OS was significantly better for AYAs versus adults 40-55 years and >55 years (98.0%, 96.4%, 87.7%; p < 0.001), as was 10-year OS (96.1%, 91.8%, 71.3% respectively; p < 0.001). The Table shows that on a MVA, OS was significantly better for AYAs versus adults 40-55 years and adults >55 years. AYA patients were also more commonly treated at centers with greater clinical volume. Additionally, AYA patients were less likely to present with metastatic disease. Accordingly, AYA patients were less likely to undergo retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (OR 0.81; p = 0.001) and were less often managed with adjuvant therapy including chemotherapy (OR 0.91; p = 0.027), RT (OR 0.93; p = 0.025), or both (OR 0.68; p = 0.020).

DISCUSSION:

AYA patients with testicular seminoma present with earlier stage disease and in the clinical Stage I setting are more often are managed with active surveillance following orchiectomy when compared with older adults in this population-based analysis. Among AYA patients, OS was modestly better when compared with adults 40-55 years and significantly better when compared with adults >55 years.

CONCLUSION:

Our objective to describe the patterns of care and survival outcomes for AYA patients with testicular seminoma in the USA was met by reviewing this large national dataset. These results may inform future guidelines for management of AYA seminoma.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Germinoma; Seminoma; Testicular cancer; Young adult

PMID:
28153774
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.12.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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