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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):e103-e108. doi: 10.1111/jgs.14729. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Acupressure, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Nursing, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan.
3
Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
4
Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan City, Taiwan.
5
Department of Healthcare Administration & Office of Physical Education, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan.
6
Nursing Department, Yuanli Lee's General Hospital, Lee's Medical Corporation, Miaoli, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Nursing home (NH) residents suffer from sleep disturbances which are associated with a low quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of comparing acupressure on specific acupoints with acupressure on non-specific acupoints in older NH residents with sleep disturbances.

DESIGN:

A randomized control trial with a pre- and post-test design.

SETTING:

One NH in Taiwan.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sixty-two older NH residents were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 31) and a sham-controlled group (n = 31).

INTERVENTION:

The experimental group received acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints three times a week for 8 weeks, for 24 minutes each time, while the control group received a massage at locations with no acupoints, which were 10 mm from the true points, at the same frequency as the experimental group.

MEASUREMENTS:

The primary outcome was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the secondary outcome was measured using the Short-form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected at baseline, the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after completion of treatment.

RESULTS:

Compared to the control group, the experimental group had significantly better scores on the PSQI (t = -7.72, P < 0.001) and SF-36 (t = 1.34, P < 0.001) during the intervention period. The improvements in the PSQI and SF-36 scores were still significant (P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding variables by generalized estimating equations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints can improve the quality of sleep and life among NH residents. Acupressure is a promising intervention that may improve well-being for NH residents with sleep disturbances.

KEYWORDS:

acupressure; complementary therapies; sleep disturbances

PMID:
28152177
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.14729
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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