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Neurology. 2017 Feb 28;88(9):909-915. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003661. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Substance abuse may hasten motor onset of Huntington disease: Evaluating the Enroll-HD database.

Author information

1
From the Departments of Pharmaceutical Care (J.L.S.), Neurology (J.L.S., J.A.K., S.M.E.F., J.S.P., P.C.N.), Psychiatry (J.A.K., D.J.M., J.S.P., P.C.N.), and Pediatrics (P.C.N.), The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City. Jordan-schultz@uiowa.edu.
2
From the Departments of Pharmaceutical Care (J.L.S.), Neurology (J.L.S., J.A.K., S.M.E.F., J.S.P., P.C.N.), Psychiatry (J.A.K., D.J.M., J.S.P., P.C.N.), and Pediatrics (P.C.N.), The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relationship between substances of abuse and age at motor onset (AMO) in patients with Huntington disease (HD) in a large and diverse patient population.

METHODS:

This was a retrospective, observational study of the Enroll-HD database. Participants were determined to belong to 1 of 3 substance abuse groups: (1) tobacco abusers, (2) alcohol abusers, and (3) drug abusers. A group of participants who had never abused substances served as a control group. The average AMO of patients in the substance abuse groups was compared to the control group. The number of CAG repeats was used as a covariate in all analyses.

RESULTS:

The average difference in AMOs of participants in the tobacco (n = 566), alcohol (n = 374), and drug abuse groups (n = 217) compared to the control group (n = 692) were 2.3 (F1, 1,258 = 33.8, p < 0.0001), 1.0 (F1, 1,066 = 4.2, p = 0.04), and 3.3 (F1, 909 = 29.7, p < 0.0001) years earlier, respectively. In all substance abuse groups, the AMO was lowered to a greater degree in female participants than it was in male participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

Substances of abuse have a strong effect on the AMO in patients with HD. These effects seem to be amplified in women with HD compared to men. These results may provide a safe intervention capable of adding disease-free years to patients with HD.

PMID:
28148631
PMCID:
PMC5331869
DOI:
10.1212/WNL.0000000000003661
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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