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J Sch Health. 2017 Mar;87(3):167-173. doi: 10.1111/josh.12488.

Investigating How to Align Schools' Marketing Environments With Federal Standards for Competitive Foods.

Author information

  • 1School of Community and Population Health, University of New England, 716 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME 04103.
  • 2Colby College, Mayflower Hill 5838, Waterville, ME 04901.
  • 3Portland Public Schools, 92 Waldron Way, Portland, ME 04102.
  • 4Department of Exercise, Health, and Sport Sciences, University of Southern Maine, 37 College Avenue, Gorham, ME 04038.
  • 5ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Limiting food and beverage marketing to children is a promising approach to influence children's nutrition behavior. School-based marketing influences nutrition behavior and studies have consistently found marketing for nonnutritious foods and beverages in schools. No studies have examined the resources necessary to align school marketing environments with federal school nutrition standards. The purpose of this study was to determine how to improve school marketing environments so that they align with new federal competitive food nutrition standards.

METHODS:

We assessed food marketing environments in 3 Portland, Maine schools using the Food and Beverage Marketing Survey (FBMS) and provided technical assistance to bring their marketing environments into conformity with the federal competitive food regulations, tracking resources and strategies for marketing removal.

RESULTS:

Noncompliant marketing was significantly reduced pre- to postintervention. Intervention strategies were facilitated by the School Health Coordinator and school-based wellness teams.

CONCLUSIONS:

Low monetary resources were required to remove marketing not compliant with federal nutrition standards for foods sold in schools. Several key challenges remain to sustain efforts. This study provides timely information for policymakers to support crafting policies that address the realities of school nutrition environments and universal enforcement challenges.

KEYWORDS:

child and adolescent health; nutrition and diet; organization and administration of school health programs; public health; school health policy

PMID:
28147461
DOI:
10.1111/josh.12488
[PubMed - in process]
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