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Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Feb 21;51(4):2105-2112. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.6b05011. Epub 2017 Jan 31.

Carbon Sequestration in Olivine and Basalt Powder Packed Beds.

Author information

1
Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis , Campus Box 1180, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States.
2
Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis , Campus Box 1180, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States.

Abstract

Fractures and pores in basalt could provide substantial pore volume and surface area of reactive minerals for carbonate mineral formation in geologic carbon sequestration. In many fractures solute transport will be limited to diffusion, and opposing chemical gradients that form as a result of concentration differences can lead to spatial distribution of silicate mineral dissolution and carbonate mineral precipitation. Glass tubes packed with grains of olivine or basalt with different grain sizes and compositions were used to explore the identity and spatial distribution of carbonate minerals that form in dead-end one-dimensional diffusion-limited zones that are connected to a larger reservoir of water in equilibrium with 100 bar CO2 at 100 °C. Magnesite formed in experiments with olivine, and Mg- and Ca-bearing siderite formed in experiments with flood basalt. The spatial distribution of carbonates varied between powder packed beds with different powder sizes. Packed beds of basalt powder with large specific surface areas sequestered more carbon per unit basalt mass than powder with low surface area. The spatial location and extent of carbonate mineral formation can influence the overall ability of fractured basalt to sequester carbon.

PMID:
28140584
DOI:
10.1021/acs.est.6b05011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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