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Environ Pollut. 2017 Apr;223:524-534. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.055. Epub 2017 Jan 27.

Characterization of black carbon in an urban-rural fringe area of Beijing.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: jds@mail.iap.ac.cn.
2
China National Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Collaboration Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters, Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Electronic address: hlzhang@lsu.edu.

Abstract

Measuring black carbon (BC) is critical to understand the impact of combustion aerosols on air quality and climate change. In this study, BC was measured in 2014 at a unique community formed with rapid economic development and urbanization in an urban-rural fringe area of Beijing. Hourly BC concentrations were 0.1-33.5 μg/m3 with the annual average of 4.4 ± 3.7 μg/m3. BC concentrations had clear diurnal, weekly, and seasonal variations, and were closely related with atmospheric visibility. The absorption coefficient of aerosols increased while its contribution to extinction coefficient decreased with the enhancement of PM2.5 concentration. The high mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of EC was attributed to a combination of coal combustion, vehicular emission and rapidly coating by water-soluble ions and organic carbon (OC). BC concentrations followed a typical lognormal pattern, with over 88% samples in 0.1-10.0 μg/m3. Low BC levels were mostly bounded up with winds from north and northwest. Coal combustion and biomass burning were closely associated with severe haze pollution events. Firework discharge had significant UV absorption contribution. During the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum in November 2014, air quality obviously improved due to various control strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Absorption coefficient; Beijing; Black carbon; Urban-rural fringe area; Visibility

PMID:
28139325
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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