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JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2017 Jan 1:148607116688881. doi: 10.1177/0148607116688881. [Epub ahead of print]

Malnutrition in Patients With Cancer.

Author information

1
1 Hematology and Cell Therapy, Tours Teaching Hospital (CHRU), Tours, France and Faculty of Medicine of Tours, University François Rabelais, Tours, France.
2
2 Dietetic and Nutrition Unit, Gustave Roussy, Cancer Campus, Grand Paris, France.
3
3 Medical Oncology, Cochin Teaching Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France and University Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
4
4 Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Tenon Teaching Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, France.
5
5 Gynecological Surgery, Gustave Roussy, Cancer Campus, Grand Paris, France.
6
6 Digestive and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Pitié-Salpêtrière Teaching Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, France.
7
7 Gastroenterology, Perpignan Hospital, Perpignan, France.
8
8 Clinical Nutrition and Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute (ICM Val d'Aurelle), Montpellier, France.
9
9 Medical Oncology, Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseille, France.
10
10 Oncology and Geriatrics, Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseille, France.
11
11 Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Nice Teaching Hospital (CHU) and University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis Nice, France.
12
12 Oncology, Antoine Lacassagne Institute, Nice, France.
13
13 Medical Oncology, Saint-Joseph Hospital, Paris, France. A complete list of collaborators is presented in the acknowledgment section.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Malnutrition is a critical predictor of toxicity and outcome in patients with cancer and may be perceived differently by patients, relatives, and physicians.

AIMS:

To assess the prevalence of malnutrition in oncology departments and to compare it with the perceptions of nutrition status by patients themselves, their closest relatives, and attending physicians.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A 1-day multicentric cross-sectional survey on the prevalence of malnutrition was conducted in different oncology departments using patient-, relative-, and physician-specific questionnaires. Malnutrition was defined by a weight loss ≥5% within 1 month or ≥10% within 6 months, a body mass index ≤18.5 kg/m2 in patients aged <70 years or ≤21 kg/m2 in patients aged ≥70 years, and/or albuminemia <35 g/L. Questionnaires for assessing medical condition, knowledge of nutrition status, and perceptions of the impact of malnutrition on daily life were distributed to consenting patients, attending physicians, and closest relatives.

RESULTS:

A total of 2197 patients were included, and 2071 and 976 questionnaires were collected from patients and relatives, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition was 39%. Physicians overestimated malnutrition (44%), whereas patients and relatives underestimated it (22% and 23%, respectively, P < .001). Conversely, malnutrition-associated symptoms were underestimated by physicians compared with patients and relatives.

CONCLUSION:

We found a prevalence of malnutrition of 39%: it was underestimated by patients and relatives and overestimated by physicians.

KEYWORDS:

caregiver; malnutrition; nutrition intervention; quality of life; supportive care

PMID:
28135422
DOI:
10.1177/0148607116688881

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