Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Elife. 2017 Feb 1;6. pii: e23670. doi: 10.7554/eLife.23670.

DNA methylation and gene expression changes derived from assisted reproductive technologies can be decreased by reproductive fluids.

Author information

1
Physiology of Reproduction Group, Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Murcia-Campus Mare Nostrum, Murcia, Spain.
2
Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria, Murcia, Spain.
3
Epigenetics Programme, The Babraham Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
4
Bioinformatics Group, The Babraham Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
5
Centre for Trophoblast Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The number of children born since the origin of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) exceeds 5 million. The majority seem healthy, but a higher frequency of defects has been reported among ART-conceived infants, suggesting an epigenetic cost. We report the first whole-genome DNA methylation datasets from single pig blastocysts showing differences between in vivo and in vitro produced embryos. Blastocysts were produced in vitro either without (C-IVF) or in the presence of natural reproductive fluids (Natur-IVF). Natur-IVF embryos were of higher quality than C-IVF in terms of cell number and hatching ability. RNA-Seq and DNA methylation analyses showed that Natur-IVF embryos have expression and methylation patterns closer to in vivo blastocysts. Genes involved in reprogramming, imprinting and development were affected by culture, with fewer aberrations in Natur-IVF embryos. Methylation analysis detected methylated changes in C-IVF, but not in Natur-IVF, at genes whose methylation could be critical, such as IGF2R and NNAT.

KEYWORDS:

In vitro fertilization; blastocyst; developmental biology; epigenetics; imprinting; pig; reproductive secretions; stem cells

PMID:
28134613
PMCID:
PMC5340525
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.23670
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center