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Neuron. 2017 Feb 8;93(3):509-521.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.12.031. Epub 2017 Jan 26.

Flexible Near-Field Wireless Optoelectronics as Subdermal Implants for Broad Applications in Optogenetics.

Author information

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802, USA.
2
Division of Basic Research, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
3
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea.
4
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Engineering and Health and Skin Disease Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA; AML, Department of Engineering Mathematics, Center for Mechanics and Materials, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
5
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802, USA; Display Research Center, Samsung Display Co., Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-920, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science & Technology Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Electrical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
8
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA.
9
Division of Basic Research, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
10
State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054, People's Republic of China.
11
Institute of Chemical Machinery and Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, People's Republic of China.
12
AML, Department of Engineering Mathematics, Center for Mechanics and Materials, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
13
School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746, Republic of Korea.
14
Institute of Solid Mechanics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, China.
15
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Engineering and Health and Skin Disease Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
16
Division of Basic Research, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
17
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: jeongsha@korea.ac.kr.
18
Division of Basic Research, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: bruchasm@wustl.edu.
19
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802, USA. Electronic address: jrogers@illinois.edu.

Abstract

In vivo optogenetics provides unique, powerful capabilities in the dissection of neural circuits implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Conventional hardware for such studies, however, physically tethers the experimental animal to an external light source, limiting the range of possible experiments. Emerging wireless options offer important capabilities that avoid some of these limitations, but the current size, bulk, weight, and wireless area of coverage is often disadvantageous. Here, we present a simple but powerful setup based on wireless, near-field power transfer and miniaturized, thin, flexible optoelectronic implants, for complete optical control in a variety of behavioral paradigms. The devices combine subdermal magnetic coil antennas connected to microscale, injectable light-emitting diodes (LEDs), with the ability to operate at wavelengths ranging from UV to blue, green-yellow, and red. An external loop antenna allows robust, straightforward application in a multitude of behavioral apparatuses. The result is a readily mass-producible, user-friendly technology with broad potential for optogenetics applications.

KEYWORDS:

ChR2; Chrimson; LED; NAc; VTA; dopamine; near-field communication; optogenetics; reward; wireless

PMID:
28132830
PMCID:
PMC5377903
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2016.12.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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