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Neuron. 2017 Feb 8;93(3):552-559.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.12.019. Epub 2017 Jan 26.

In Vivo Imaging of Dentate Gyrus Mossy Cells in Behaving Mice.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Doctoral Program in Neurobiology and Behavior, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas (FORTH), 700 13 Heraklion, Crete, Greece; Department of Biology, School of Sciences and Engineering, University of Crete, 741 00 Heraklion, Crete, Greece, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
4
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas (FORTH), 700 13 Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
5
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas (FORTH), 700 13 Heraklion, Crete, Greece. Electronic address: poirazi@imbb.forth.gr.
6
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: al2856@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Mossy cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus constitute a major excitatory principal cell type in the mammalian hippocampus; however, it remains unknown how these cells behave in vivo. Here, we have used two-photon Ca2+ imaging to monitor the activity of mossy cells in awake, behaving mice. We find that mossy cells are significantly more active than dentate granule cells in vivo, exhibit spatial tuning during head-fixed spatial navigation, and undergo robust remapping of their spatial representations in response to contextual manipulation. Our results provide a functional characterization of mossy cells in the behaving animal and demonstrate their active participation in spatial coding and contextual representation.

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