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Prev Med. 2017 Jun;99:7-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.013. Epub 2017 Jan 26.

Economic evaluation of future skin cancer prevention in Australia.

Author information

1
Deakin Health Economics, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC 3025, Australia. Electronic address: sophy.shih@deakin.edu.au.
2
Deakin Health Economics, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC 3025, Australia. Electronic address: rob.carter@deakin.edu.au.
3
SunSmart Program, Cancer Council Victoria, WHO Collaborative Centre for UV Radiation, 615 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia. Electronic address: shew2708@gmail.com.
4
Prevention Division, Cancer Council Victoria, 615 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia. Electronic address: Craig.Sinclair@cancervic.org.au.

Abstract

Public health programs to reduce the significant burden of skin cancer have been implemented in Australia and around the world. The economic rationale for prevention needs to be kept up-to-date as relevant disease patterns, risk factors and expenditure patterns change through time. The aim of this study was to update and extend the economic credentials for skin cancer prevention in Australia. Economic evaluations were conducted in 2015 with multiple methods applied, including cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis, multiple study perspectives ('societal', 'health sector', '3rd party funder') and counterfactual analysis sourced from cancer incidence between 1982 and 2011. Modelled outcomes included 'cases prevented', 'deaths averted' and 'health-adjusted life-years'. Cost-benefit Analysis, including productivity impacts in the general economy, was conducted. With an additional $AUD 0.16 ($USD 0.12) per capita investment into future skin cancer prevention across Australia, 140,000 skin cancer cases would be prevented over the 20year reference period (2011 to 2030). Depending on study perspective and method, the upgraded program is either dominant (achieving both health gains and cost offsets) or highly cost-effective (health gain at modest net cost). Return on investment (ROI) was $AUD 3.20 per dollar invested, with net social benefit of $AUD 1.43 billion. The study confirmed the strong economic credentials for skin cancer prevention and provided sound arguments for increased investment in Australia. The reference case analysis provides a useful benchmark for other countries to consider in the design and funding of their prevention programs.

KEYWORDS:

Cost-benefit analysis; Cost-effectiveness; Economics; Prevention; Skin cancer

PMID:
28131778
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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