Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Mar;144(3):496-502. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.01.019. Epub 2017 Jan 26.

Role of hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in the management of early-stage borderline ovarian tumors.

Author information

1
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: koji.matsuo@med.usc.edu.
2
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
4
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
Department of Gynecologic Oncology & Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine survival of women with stage T1 borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) stratified by hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy status at surgery.

METHODS:

This is a retrospective study examining The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program to identify surgically-treated stage T1 BOTs between 1988 and 2003 (n=4943). Association of surgery patterns and cause-specific survival (CSS) was examined in multivariable analysis.

RESULTS:

Mean age was 48.7. The majority had stage T1a disease (75.3%). Median follow-up was 15.6years and 159 (3.2%) women died of BOTs. Hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy were performed in 1909 (38.6%) and 1295 (26.2%) cases, respectively. Most commonly, neither procedure was performed (46.5%), followed by hysterectomy alone (27.3%), lymphadenectomy alone (14.9%), and both procedures (11.3%). Surgery patterns for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy significantly differed across age, ethnicity, marital status, registry area, year at diagnosis, histology type, sub-stage, and tumor size (all, P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, surgery patterns for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy were not associated with CSS: 20-year rates for neither hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy 96.7%, hysterectomy alone 94.5%, lymphadenectomy alone 95.7%, and both procedures 95.2% (adjusted-P>0.05). Age≥50, T1b-c stages, and mucinous histology remained independent prognostic factors for decreased CSS (all, P<0.05). Among 3723 women with stage T1a disease, hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy patterns were not associated with CSS in 2115 women aged <50 (P=0.14) and 1608 women aged ≥50 (P=0.48).

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggests that both hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy may be omitted in the surgical management of women with stage T1 BOTs, especially for those with T1a disease regardless of age.

KEYWORDS:

Borderline ovarian tumor; Hysterectomy; Low malignant potential; Lymphadenectomy; Ovarian cancer; Survival

PMID:
28131526
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.01.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center