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J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2017 Nov;45(8):1491-1502. doi: 10.1007/s10802-016-0260-7.

Does Preschool Self-Regulation Predict Later Behavior Problems in General or Specific Problem Behaviors?

Author information

1
Department Psychology, Florida State University, 1107 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-4301, USA. lonigan@psy.fsu.edu.
2
Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. lonigan@psy.fsu.edu.
3
Department Psychology, Florida State University, 1107 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-4301, USA.
4
Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA.
5
Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.
6
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.

Abstract

Findings from prior research have consistently indicated significant associations between self-regulation and externalizing behaviors. Significant associations have also been reported between children's language skills and both externalizing behaviors and self-regulation. Few studies to date, however, have examined these relations longitudinally, simultaneously, or with respect to unique clusters of externalizing problems. The current study examined the influence of preschool self-regulation on general and specific externalizing behavior problems in early elementary school and whether these relations were independent of associations between language, self-regulation, and externalizing behaviors in a sample of 815 children (44% female). Additionally, given a general pattern of sex differences in the presentations of externalizing behavior problems, self-regulation, and language skills, sex differences for these associations were examined. Results indicated unique relations of preschool self-regulation and language with both general externalizing behavior problems and specific problems of inattention. In general, self-regulation was a stronger longitudinal correlate of externalizing behavior for boys than it was for girls, and language was a stronger longitudinal predictor of hyperactive/impulsive behavior for girls than it was for boys.

KEYWORDS:

Executive function; Externalizing behavior; Inattention; Preschool; Self-regulation

PMID:
28130704
DOI:
10.1007/s10802-016-0260-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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