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Addict Behav. 2017 Jun;69:42-47. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.01.006. Epub 2017 Jan 7.

Individual, interpersonal, and contextual factors associated with discrepancies between intended and actual spring break drinking.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 1100 NE 45(th) St., Suite 300, Seattle, WA 98105, United States. Electronic address: leecm@uw.edu.
2
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, 426 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248, United States.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 1100 NE 45(th) St., Suite 300, Seattle, WA 98105, United States.
4
College of Community and Public Affairs, Binghamton University, PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902, United States.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 1100 NE 45(th) St., Suite 300, Seattle, WA 98105, United States; National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 795 Willow Rd. (NC-PTSD), 344, B270, Menlo Park, CA 94025, United States.

Abstract

The purpose of the present paper was to examine the extent to which college students underestimate the quantity of alcohol they will consume during Spring Break (SB), and whether individual, interpersonal, and contextual factors may be related to underestimation of SB drinking and drinking consequences. College students participated in web-based surveys prior to and after SB (N=603; 57% women). Overall, results indicated that individual factors (being male, being a member of a fraternity or sorority, previously experiencing more alcohol-related consequences, and intending to drink less during SB), interpersonal factors (reporting friends encourage getting drunk), and contextual factors (going on a SB trip with friends and receiving drinks from others) predicted underestimating peak drinks consumed during SB. Underestimating the peak number of drinks to be consumed on SB was associated with experiencing a greater number of alcohol-related consequences. Targeted interventions designed specifically to focus on underestimation of college student drinking and the impact of SB contextual and interpersonal factors may be an important area of study to reduce negative consequences of alcohol use during SB.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol use; College student; Risk factors; Spring break

PMID:
28129612
PMCID:
PMC5370076
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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