Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Rep. 2017 Jan 24;18(4):905-917. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.12.085.

Coordinated Acetylcholine Release in Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus Is Associated with Arousal and Reward on Distinct Timescales.

Author information

1
Lilly Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Eli Lilly and Company Ltd., Erl Wood Manor, Windlesham, Surrey GU20 6PH, UK; Centre for Synaptic Plasticity, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK.
2
Department of Chemistry, Maynooth University, Co. Kildare, Ireland.
3
Lilly Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Eli Lilly and Company Ltd., Erl Wood Manor, Windlesham, Surrey GU20 6PH, UK.
4
Department of Chemistry, Maynooth University, Co. Kildare, Ireland. Electronic address: john.lowry@nuim.ie.
5
Centre for Synaptic Plasticity, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK. Electronic address: jack.mellor@bristol.ac.uk.

Abstract

Cholinergic neurotransmission throughout the neocortex and hippocampus regulates arousal, learning, and attention. However, owing to the poorly characterized timing and location of acetylcholine release, its detailed behavioral functions remain unclear. Using electrochemical biosensors chronically implanted in mice, we made continuous measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of acetylcholine release across multiple behavioral states. We found that tonic levels of acetylcholine release were coordinated between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and maximal during training on a rewarded working memory task. Tonic release also increased during REM sleep but was contingent on subsequent wakefulness. In contrast, coordinated phasic acetylcholine release occurred only during the memory task and was strongly localized to reward delivery areas without being contingent on trial outcome. These results show that coordinated acetylcholine release between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus is associated with reward and arousal on distinct timescales, providing dual mechanisms to support learned behavior acquisition during cognitive task performance.

KEYWORDS:

acetylcholine; biosensor; hippocampus; prefrontal cortex

PMID:
28122241
PMCID:
PMC5289927
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.12.085
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center