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Br J Surg. 2017 Jan;104(2):e172-e181. doi: 10.1002/bjs.10449.

Impact of preoperative infection on outcome after liver transplantation.

Author information

1
General and Transplant Surgery Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
2
Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bacterial infection in patients with liver failure can lead to a dramatic clinical deterioration. The indications for liver transplantation and outcome in these patients is still controversial.

METHODS:

All adult patients who underwent liver transplantation between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2015 were selected from an institutional database. Characteristics of the donors and recipients, and clinical, biochemical and surgical parameters were retrieved from the database. Post-transplant survival rates and complications, including grade III-IV complications according to the Dindo-Clavien classification, were compared between patients with an infection 1 month before transplantation and patients without an infection.

RESULTS:

Eighty-four patients with an infection had statistically significant higher Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD), D-MELD and Balance of Risk (BAR) scores and a higher rate of acute-on-chronic liver failure compared with findings in 343 patients with no infection. The rate of infection after liver transplantation was higher in patients who had an infection before the operation: 48 per cent versus 30·6 per cent in those with no infection before transplantation (P = 0·003). The percentage of patients with a postoperative complication (42 versus 40·5 per cent respectively; P = 0·849) and the 90-day mortality rate (8 versus 6·4 per cent; P = 0·531) was no different between the groups. Multivariable analysis showed that a BAR score greater than 18 and acute-on-chronic liver failure were independent predictors of 90-day mortality.

CONCLUSION:

Bacterial infection 1 month before liver transplantation is related to a higher rate of infection after transplantation, but does not lead to a worse outcome.

PMID:
28121031
DOI:
10.1002/bjs.10449
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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