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Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol. 1989 Aug;340(2):239-45.

Absorption and presystemic glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in the vascularly fluorocarbon emulsion perfused rat small intestine. The influence of 1-naphthol concentration, perfusate flow and noradrenaline.

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1
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Using the isolated vascularly fluorocarbon emulsion perfused rat small intestine some factors which determine the extent of the intestinal glucuronidation of 1-naphthol to 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide were studied. Increasing the luminal 1-naphthol concentration resulted in a concomitant increase in the 1-naphthol appearance in the vascular perfusate. In contrast, the total appearance of 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide increased less than proportional to the increase in the luminal 1-naphthol concentration. About 88% of the total amount of 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide excreted was released into the vascular perfusate. The capacity-limited intestinal glucuronide efflux is most likely due to saturation of the excretory mechanism for 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide. Decreasing the vascular flow rate influenced both the appearance of 1-naphthol and 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide in the vascular perfusate, whereas the appearance of 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide in the luminal perfusate was essentially flow-independent. A noradrenaline-induced change in the haemodynamic state of the vascular bed (with the total flow kept constant) resulted in a marked decrease in the naphthol vascular concentration. The vascular 1-naphthol-beta-D-glucuronide concentration was only slightly affected. These results indicate that changes in blood flow and blood flow distribution within the intestinal wall can affect the extent of presystemic intestinal metabolism by interfering with the absorption of the parent compound and the efflux of formed conjugates. These parameters can be of paramount importance for causing variable intestinal first-pass effects of drugs in vivo.

PMID:
2812036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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