Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can Fam Physician. 2017 Jan;63(1):45-50.

Effect of comorbidities and medications on frequency of primary care visits among older patients.

Author information

1
Medical student, at the University of Toronto in Ontario. tina.hu@mail.utoronto.ca.
2
Second-year family medicine resident, at the University of Toronto in Ontario.
3
Medical student, at the University of Toronto in Ontario.
4
Research associate, in the Primary Care Research Unit with the Sunnybrook Academic Family Health Team in Toronto.
5
Research assistant, in the Primary Care Research Unit with the Sunnybrook Academic Family Health Team in Toronto.
6
Emergency physician at Mount Sinai Hospital and Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto.
7
Family physician at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto.
8
Family physician at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.
9
Family physician at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and a research scientist in the Primary Care Research Unit with the Sunnybrook Academic Family Health Team.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if comorbidities and high-risk medications affect the frequency of family physician visits among older patients.

DESIGN:

Retrospective chart review.

SETTING:

Academic family health team at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Ont.

PARTICIPANTS:

Among patients aged 65 years and older who were registered patients of the family health team between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, the 5% who visited their family physicians most frequently and the 5% who visited their family physicians least frequently were selected for the study (N = 265).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Predictors of frequent visits to family physicians.

RESULTS:

The significant predictors of being a high-frequency user were female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.20, P = .03), age older than 85 years (OR = 5.35, P = .001), and higher total number of medications (OR = 1.49, P < .001). Age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, number of Beers criteria medications, and Anticholinergic Risk Scale score were not significant predictors (P > .05).

CONCLUSION:

Female sex, age older than 85, and higher total number of medications were independent significant predictors of higher frequency of family physician visits among older patients. Validated tools, such as the Charlson comorbidity index, Beers criteria, and Anticholinergic Risk Scale, did not independently predict the frequency of visits, indicating that predicting frequency of visits is likely complex.

PMID:
28115442
PMCID:
PMC5257221
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center