Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Sch Health. 1989 Oct;59(8):359-61.

Risk of pregnancy and dropping out of school among special education adolescents.

Author information

1
New Image Teen Theatre, Planned Parenthood, San Diego, CA 92101.

Abstract

This study examined the temporal relationship between dropping out of school and teen-age pregnancy, and whether or not teens in special education programs are at greater risk for pregnancy and dropping out than non-special education teens. Cumulative Student Records and case files were reviewed on a random sample of 135 already pregnant girls served by the San Diego Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting (SANDAPP) program. A comparison was made of ages at time of dropping out and conception of the first live birth between special education and non-special education groups. The overall prevalence of special education teens in the program was compared with the prevalence rate of 10% in the San Diego Unified School District. Results indicated 20% of SANDAPP adolescents were in special education compared to 10% for the overall school district. Special education teens dropped out of school significantly earlier than non-special education teens. No significant evidence supported the hypothesis that teens dropped out of school first, then became pregnant. Nor was there significant evidence to suggest special education teens experience their first live birth at younger ages than their non-special education counterparts. No relationship was found between mean grade point average and age at conception. The researchers concluded that special education teens are at higher risk for pregnancy and dropping out of school than non-special education teens.

PIP:

This study examined the temporal relationship between dropping out of school and teen-age pregnancy, and whether or not teens in special education programs are at greater risk for pregnancy and dropping out than non-special education teens. Cumulative Students Records and case files were reviewed on a random sample of 135 already pregnant girls served by the San Diego Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting (SANDAPP) program. A comparison was made of ages at time of dropping out and conception of the first live birth between special education and non-special education groups. The overall prevalence of special education teens in the program was compared with the prevalence rate of 10% in the San Diego Unified School District. Results indicated 20% of SANDAPP adolescents were in special education compared to 10% for the overall school district. Special education teens dropped out of school significantly earlier than non-special education teens. No significant evidence supported the hypothesis that teens dropped out of school first, then became pregnant.. Nor was there significant evidence to suggest special education teens experience their first live birth at younger ages than their non-special education counterparts. No relationship was found between mean grade point average and age at conception. The researchers concluded that special education teens are at higher risk for pregnancy and dropping out of school than non-special education teens. (Author's).

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center